Greg LeMond Recovering After Car Crash, US Cyclist and Tour de France Champ Starts New Company and Wants To Run International Cycling Union

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Feb 05, 2013 11:37 AM EST
Greg LeMond of the U.S.
Greg LeMond, a United States cyclist and three-time Tour de France winner, crashed his car in a Minneapolis suburb last week and is recovering from some injuries, including back pain. Greg LeMond of the U.S. and Tour de France leader Laurent Fignon of France stand on the podium at the end of the Tour de France cycling race in Paris in this July 23, 1989 file picture. (Photo : Reuters) "

Greg LeMond, a United States cyclist and three-time Tour de France winner, crashed his car in a Minneapolis suburb last week and is recovering from some injuries, including back pain.

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According to FOX Sports, LeMond crashed his car in a Minneapolis suburb last Wednesday, hitting a fence and shrubs, and then an embankment before ending up in the back yard of a home. The report says the 51-year-old LeMond went to a hospital with back pain and its possible he may have lost consciousness before the accident.

LeMond was one of the top American cyclists and was the first United State competitor to win the Tour de France, taking it in in 1986. He also won the Tour in 1989 and 1990.

News came out on Monday that LeMond was starting a new cycling equipment company in Minnesota and that it will be named LeMond Inc. According to TwinCities.com, the company will develop and market new products related to the LeMond Revolution, a stationary bicycle training attachment designed to simulate outdoor riding condition and will be headquartered in Minneapolis.

The company will be run day-to-day by LeMond's son Geoff and the office currently has four employees.  LeMond, who lives in Medina, said in a statement that he is excited to bring the company to Minneapolis.

Last year in December LeMond made some news when he criticized the Lance Armstrong scandal and said that he would be willing to run the UCI sometimes in the future as they try to move on from the doping scandals.

 "I would love to be part of the process of change and if that means as interim president then I would be willing to do that," LeMond said to the Associated Press. "I said if we can't find anyone more qualified, I will do whatever I can to help change the sport. I am definitely not pushing myself ... cycling needs radical change, it needs new leadership."

 LeMond questioned the leadership of the union after the report by U.S. Anti-Doping Agency came out that condemned Armstrong.

"During this investigation you can't have the fox guarding the henhouse, and that means they need to willingly step down -- now," LeMond said. "Will they? Most likely not because they are protecting their own position. It will take pressure."

Armstrong sat down with Oprah last month and spoke about the doping scandal and allegations, offering apologies for everyone he hurt.

Armstrong has quickly gone from one of the most revered and respected athletes in the world to one of the most controversial. He was dogged by doping allegations for many years, but always fought back and claimed he was clean. Armstrong was stripped of all seven Tour titles following the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report that portrayed him as cheater and a ruthless cyclist who would do anything to win.

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